Heidelberg Catechism – Lord’s Day 30

Question 80: How does the Lord’s Supper differ from the Roman Catholic Mass?

The Lord’s Supper declares to us that all our sins are completely forgiven through the one sacrifice of Jesus Christ, which He Himself accomplished on the cross once for all (1). It also declares to us that the Holy Spirit grafts us into Christ (2), who with His true body is now in heaven at the right hand of the Father (3) where He wants us to worship Him (4).

But the Mass teaches that the living and the dead do not have their sins forgiven through the suffering of Christ unless Christ is still offered for them daily by the priests. It also teaches that Christ is bodily present under the form of bread and wine where Christ is therefore to be worshiped. Thus the Mass is basically nothing but a denial of the one sacrifice and suffering of Jesus Christ and a condemnable idolatry.

1 – John 19:30; Heb. 7:27; 9:12, 25-26; 10:10-18
2 – 1 Cor. 6:17; 10:16-17
3 – Acts 7:55-56; Heb. 1:3; 8:1
4 – Matt. 6:20-21; John 4:21-24; Phil. 3:20; Col. 3:1-3

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Question 81: Who should come to the Lord’s table?

Those who are displeased with themselves because of their sins, but who nevertheless trust that their sins are pardoned and that their remaining weakness is covered by the suffering and death of Christ, and who also desire more and more to strengthen their faith and to lead a better life.

Hypocrites and those who are unrepentant, however, eat and drink judgment on themselves (1).

1 – 1 Cor. 10:19-22; 11:26-32

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Question 82: Should those be admitted to the Lord’s Supper who show by what they profess and how they live that they are unbelieving and ungodly?

No, that would dishonor God’s covenant and bring down God’s wrath upon the entire congregation (1). Therefore, according to the instruction of Christ and His apostles, the Christian church is duty-bound to exclude such people, by the official use of the keys of the kingdom, until they reform their lives.

1 – 1 Cor. 11:17-32; Ps. 50:14-16; Isa. 1:11-17

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