Theology in the Weeds

I was doing some yard work yesterday and I pondered once again how easy it is for the weeds to grow.  It’s usually pretty tough to grow the things you want, but the weeds will grow just about anywhere and everywhere.  Once again it dawned on me that the simple problem of weeds is yet another sign of living in a creation post-Fall.  As part of the curse of Adam’s original sin, we are told that we will be frustrated in our industrious pursuits (Gen. 3:17-19).  Even in today’s world of vast technological advances, we still have to deal with weeds in our garden.

There seems to be a great disconnection between how society (past and present) sees the world and how it is seen from a Christian worldview.  The world believes that it is possible to heal the earth of all its ills and that human knowledge is actually capable of fulfilling that task.  With each technological advance or alleged societal breakthrough, the “progressives” of the world tell us that utopia is just around the next corner.  How many times have we seen this happen in world history?  And it all stems from an unbiblical view of man and creation.

Death itself is a constant reminder of our fallen state as well, something our culture always tries to whitewash.  There seems to be a collective mentality to suppress the reality of the Fall and idolize ourselves in assuming that we can overcome its effects.  As Christians, we are reminded of the Fall even as we engage in simple tasks like gardening.  We understand what this world is and look forward to the day when all of creation is redeemed by God–a new heavens and a new earth.

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